Senators Introduce Legislation to Repeal 2002 Resolution Authorizing Use of Military Force Against Iraq

Press Contact : 

adam_sharon@foreign.senate.gov



Washington, DC – U.S. Sens. Robert Menendez (D-NJ), Barbara Boxer (D-CA), Ben Cardin (D-MD), and Tim Kaine (D-VA) introduced legislation today repealing the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) Against Iraq that passed in 2002.

The legislation was introduced following a hearing yesterday in the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the AUMFs for Iraq and Afghanistan.

“The time to repeal the Authorization for Use of Military Force for Iraq is past due,” said Chairman Menendez. “Our service members completed their mission with distinction and courage when combat operations ceased in 2010 and the U.S. Congress must fulfill its obligation and repeal the AUMF. I voted against the Iraq War, and now, after nearly 5,000 of our bravest American souls paid the ultimate sacrifice for their country, we have a responsibility to formally end this state of conflict and rescind this open-ended AUMF for Iraq.”

“Voting against the resolution authorizing the use of military force in Iraq was one of my proudest moments as a Senator,” said Senator Boxer. “It is long past time to close this tragic chapter in American history.”

“I always believed invading Iraq was a mistake and voted against granting the President that authority in 2003.  I commend President Obama for a more thoughtful approach than his predecessor, allowing the Iraqis to take responsibility for the security and sustainability of their nation” said Senator Cardin. “Now Congress must act and repeal the Resolution Authorizing Use of Military Force Against Iraq.  Here at home, we are committed to do everything possible to support the health and well-being of the brave men and women who have returned home from war.”

"The open-ended nature of the Authorizations for the Use of Military Force in both the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is extremely concerning," said Senator Kaine. "Even though U.S. combat operations in Iraq ended nearly 3 years ago, the AUMF approved by Congress in 2003 remains. It's my hope that repealing the Iraq AUMF will move us closer to considering the continued viability of the 2001 Afghanistan AUMF."

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